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Updates found with 'delhi ncr dr rajesh'

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Updates found with 'delhi ncr dr rajesh'

Iasogurgaon best Occupational Therapy 6 to 12 Months baby.Play is the stuff of childhood. Play is lots of fun. It’s also an extremely important part of your baby’s development. Play enables your baby to learn about their world through moving, manipulating and interacting with the environment. Your baby’s style of play will change and become more sophisticated as he grows. These changes in play form the basis for development of fine and gross motor skills, communication skills, social skills, cognitive and imaginative skills, and daily living skills.BABIES: 6 to 12 monthsWHAT IS SPECIAL ABOUT THIS STAGE OFDEVELOPMENT?From 6 to 12 months your baby is:• depending on you for most of his day-to-day needs; • getting control of his body; • learning to eat solid foods; • learning to interact with other people; • discovering his hands; • often needing your attention; • needing you close (keeping you in sight); • developing confidence; and • wanting to explore. Babies explore their environment by feeling, smelling, tasting, looking, moving, listening and enjoying the world around them. They discover they have fingers and toes and begin to use their eyes and hands to manipulate objects. Babies also begin to recognise the difference between speech sounds and other environmental noises. They become more “tuned in” to the meanings of sounds and start to experiment with making vocalisations that have different effects (e.g. happy cooing vs angry or unhappy sounds). Through interacting with their environment in these ways, babies discover the relationship between cause and effect, and begin to show some control over their environment.Play at this age is generally solo, but can be encouraged and stimulated by those around them through providing different objects and environments to explore. Lots of love and affection from family is also essential for developing your baby’s feeling of security within the world and courage to face new challenges.Floor play:It is important for your baby to have time playing on the floor rather than just spending a lot of time in a seated position. Time playing on the floor will give your baby the opportunity to develop movement skills.Tummy play:Give your baby some time to play on his tummy to encourage active lifting of the head and strengthening of the neck, chest and shoulder muscles. This will help to develop head control, which is important for future development of skills such as sitting.If your child gets upset when placed on his tummy it may be just that he finds it hard work. Try to begin with regular but short periods of tummy play, building up the time as he enjoys it more. A wedge or rolled towel under their chest may also be of help. Your Physiotherapist will also be able to give you some ideas to make tummy play a more enjoyable experience for you and your baby.Hand Play:Your baby’s hands are very important for helping him to explore the world. To begin with, most babies’ hand and arm movements are quite random. They tend to use their whole arm to swing or bat at toys that have been placed in front of them. Very quickly they learn that they can use their hands for lots of fun things like grasping toys or their other hand, and playing with their mouth. Watching their own hands move also provides hours of entertainment. These games mark the beginning of your baby’s eye-hand coordination and fine motor skills. It is very important to give babies time in positions where hands are free for playing. This may involve the use of, for example, a corner chair.Communication and social interaction during play:Children learn how to communicate with the world soon after they are a born. Good communication skills will be needed for expressing their emotions and needs, understanding other people, learning new information and skills, and forming relationships with others. Anything that your baby does to make his needs, wants and interests known involves communication, (e.g. crying, whinging, using gestures, sounds, words, and/or signs).By about 12 months of age babies recognise their own name and begin saying their first words, such as “mama” and “dada”. They enjoy games like peek-a-boo and love listening to new words when looking at books with their parent. They actively seek their parents’ attention and can indicate when they want something by reaching and using their voice. Smiling, laughing and catching your eye are all lots of fun and mark the beginnings of good social skills.TOYS for babies between 6 & 12 mths1. Mirrors are useful for learning the names of body parts, encouraging reaching and smiling. 2. Cause effect toys (e.g. pop up toy) help to teach the relationship between action and outcome, which is very important for the development of prediction and eventually problem solving skills. 3. Peek-a-boo and pat-a-cake are great games for encouraging turn taking, eye-contact, and copying actions. 4. Tupperware Containers/ nesting cups can be great for developing awareness of concepts “in” and “out” etc 5. Blocks are great for banging together, placing in and out of containers, building towers and knocking them down again. Encourage talking by accompanying actions with words e.g.“bang bang bang” . 6. Bath play provides lots of sensory experiences: the wet cloth, the plastic cup, the rubber ducky, the thick, warm towel. In the bath; tipping, scooping, clapping, splashing. Babies learn about their bodies, and bathtime can also be a time to introduce toy cups, to encourage development of cup drinking skills. 7. Thick cardboard books are good for encouraging baby to use both hands in the midline of the body, one hand stabilises the book, whilst the other grasps and turns the page. Useful for learning names of objects and actions and developing listening skills.
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